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Free Flash Fiction:

Where Babies Come From

By: Jae El Foster

February 24, 2019

At twelve years old, the last thing Bobby wanted was to know where babies came from. The discussion in his Biology class was disgusting, and the film they were watching was even grosser. Now, as far as he was concerned, the human body was a sick and twisted thing. Nature was even worse. Animals had no dignity when it came to their wild instincts.

When class was dismissed, he heard his fellow pupils giggling over the knowledge they’d just gained as they departed the classroom. Bobby was the last to leave, and much to his dismay, his teacher stopped him just before he could reach the door.

“You didn’t seem to pay much attention to the presentation today,” his teacher told him.

“I don’t see why we have to have this as part of Biology class, Mr. Wayward,” he replied.

“The six-segment sexual education course was added to Biology through the PTA and a vote through the school board, Bobby. Even if I wanted to remove it from the curriculum, I couldn’t. Besides, it’s important for you kids to gain some kind of knowledge about how life works and is created.”

“It all seems so sick,” the boy replied. “None of it can really be true.”

“Okay,” Mr. Wayward said, putting his hands on his hips. “Then tell me. Where do you think babies come from?”

“Anywhere but where that video said,” he answered. “That was like something from a horror movie!”

Mr. Wayward laughed a bit and Bobby sighed. “I suppose you’re right. Life can be a bit like a scary movie. Either way, that was the end of the course and you have the whole weekend ahead of you. When you return Monday, we’ll be back on our discussion of aquatic life.”

“That sounds a lot better,” Bobby said with a grin and bid his teacher a good weekend.

Normally, Bobby would have taken the bus home, but his house was only three blocks away and the sun was shining its warmth all around. Besides, he needed the walk to clear his head. He knew just about everyone on his bus would be discussing what they’d learned, and he didn’t want to think about it anymore.

His mother was expecting a second child, as it was. Bobby would soon have a little brother or sister, and he had been excited about it until he’d learned how that little sibling had been created. Now, he was sickened by it.

During his walk, he tried to replace thoughts of intercourse and umbilical fluid with those of baseball and swimming pools. Yet, when he reached his house and his mother opened the door, one look at her massive stomach wrapped in a large yellow dress made him want to faint.

“Is everything okay, Bobby?” she asked him as he stepped inside. “You look pale. Did you eat lunch?”

“Yeah, I ate,” he said, dropping his backpack to the ground and walking to the stairs. “It was slop.”

“That slop keeps you healthy!”

“Hey, champ!” said Bobby’s father as he entered from the kitchen. “Good day at school today?”

“I’m going to take a nap.”

Bobby didn’t glance back once at his parents as he stepped up the stairs. All he could think about was what they’d done to create that baby in her belly. It made him feel ill.

He lay on his bed and picked up a comic book. It was a superhero comic and he didn’t care which one. Anything to distract his thoughts. Yet, as he tried to focus on the comic, he could hear his parents chatting as they climbed the stairs. Even with his door closed, he could make out nearly every word.

“The baby will cheer him up,” he heard his mother say. “Should we go ahead and do it?”

“It’s been nine months,” his father added. “I don’t see why not.”

Bobby heard them enter their bedroom and shut the door. Were they about to deliver the baby right there? Oh, no… not in the house. He wasn’t having that.

Off his bed, he flew. He opened his door and stepped into the hallway. With slow, anxious but nervous steps, he approached his parents’ door. He stood outside for a moment, listening, but he could hear nothing. Surely there would be screaming or something, like on the video in class. Hesitantly, he gripped the doorknob and twisted.

When he opened the door, their bedroom was empty. His parents were nowhere to be seen. However, their closet door was slightly ajar and Bobby approached it. When he opened it fully, his eyes grew wide. Instead of clothes and shoes, there was a long black hallway. Cautiously, he began to step through it, noticing a door far at the end.

Eventually, Bobby reached the door, curious about how this hall could have even existed in their two-level but smallish home. Swallowing hard through a lump in his throat, he opened the mysterious door.

It was loud inside the massive room of electronics, machines, computers and conveyor belts. Bobby recognized immediately that he had stepped into some sort of enormous laboratory, and his parents were currently standing near three men in white lab coats, smiling happily as they watched one of the conveyor belts.

Bobby’s eyes traced the belt to a series of tubes and machines. He watched in shock as one of the overhead tubes began to drop babies out of it and onto the conveyor belt.

“Take your choice, Mr. and Mrs. Goodall,” one of the men said cheerfully. “These are the best on the market – fully advanced and will function as you train them.”

“Our last one has been reacting a bit… weirdly,” Bobby’s father said. “He’s twelve now and…”

“Say no more, Mr. Goodall. We have fixed that puberty defect with these latest models. No more teenage mood swings – guaranteed.”

Mother chose a baby boy with blue eyes and blond hair. She handed him to Father, who held the freshly processed child closely while Mother reached up her dress and pulled out the fake belly that she’d been wearing to guise the ‘pregnancy.’

Bobby, bewildered, stunned and panicked, turned to run – to return through the hallway, into his home, and then out of it as fast as he could. Yet, when he turned, he faced two large guards, one of which rendered him unconscious.

End

Copyright Jae El Foster, 2019